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S. Erdem Aytaç and Susan Stokes introduce their recent title "Why Bother?: Rethinking Participation in Elections and Protests" to 1584.

Adapted from Morality and the Environmental Crisis We cannot heal our relation to nature—and even perhaps include nature into a new and vibrant “ecological” democracy—with methods we have used...

Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca, introduces his forthcoming Cambridge title, 'The Historical Roots of Political Violence'

As an American, I can’t help but read the slow-motion drama that is Brexit through the lens of the 2016 Trump election. Each is a referendum on a half-century of internationalist and neoliberal policies...

Must law pass a moral test in order to be valid? Most legal theorists today answer this question in the negative. The dominant tradition in contemporary legal philosophy, known as legal positivism, maintains...

Natural law theories maintain that there are certain goods and principles that are uniquely conducive to human flourishing. Historically, the content of natural law has often been depicted as timeless...

The Desert Fathers were the earliest Christian monks. They are the foundation stone of a movement that so developed over the centuries that it eventually wholly took over the Western Church and almost...

Simon Black, Author of, Species Conservation; Lessons from Islands, explains how our challenge is to understand how we can co-exist with nature by addressing two drivers of change. First, we need the positive efforts of the few people who have necessary technical skills to transform wild ecosystems. Second, we need to divert the negative impact of the millions of us human consumers (who create the problem in the first place) and reverse our psychological separation from the natural world.

Jamie A. Copsey, Author of Species Conservation, tells us how he thinks the world needs more positive perspectives on the future we want to shape, and then we can really start thinking about how we get there.

David Johns, Author of, Conservation Politics; The Last Anti-Colonial Battle, tells us how ultimately global conservation is failing. Why, when the majority of people say they value nature and its protection? David Johns argues that the loss of species and healthy ecosystems is best understood as human imposition of a colonial relationship on the non-human world - one of exploitation and domination.

Sergei Volis' book, Plant Conservation, argues that existing practises of plant conservation are inadequate and firmly supports the placement of ecological restoration at the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. The author unifies different aspects of conservation into one coherent concept, including natural area protection, ex situ conservation and in situ interventions through either population management or ecological restoration.

Among the core cultural rights, outlined in the International Bill of Human Rights, are the rights to education, to participate in cultural life, to benefit from science and its products, and author’s...

Dementia as life. That sounds all wrong, doesn’t it? Just look at the facts. Dementia is the umbrella term for a number of different organic brain diseases, which are progressive and terminal. Its symptoms...

Mathematics rivals theology when it comes to ontological difficulties Mathematics rivals theology when it comes to ontological difficulties; consequently there are today three very different philosophical...

Fatemah Alzubairi discusses her new book Colonialism, Neo-Colonialism, and Anti-Terrorism Law in the Arab World.

Do you have a soul? In ancient Greece, answering ‘yes’ to this question would not necessarily imply that you had any strange metaphysical or religious beliefs. This is because, for an ancient Greek,...

Ecologists have fully embraced the study of climate change and grassland ecologists have often led the way in these studies, thanks to the tractability of doing ecological research in such environments, publishing nearly 1000 studies in that time. My colleague, David Gibson, and I decided it was time to take stock of what we have learned, at least for grasslands! This is the first review to focus solely on climate change.

Authors, Beatrice, Jenny and Silvio tell us about how the research emphasis has recently expanded from a focus on conflicts to include the broad spectrum of interactions between people and wildlife that range from negative to neutral to positive.

Managing Director of Academic Publishing, Mandy Hill, reflects on why it is important to mark International Women's Day and why Cambridge University Press are making related content free and accessible throughout March.

Certain intellectual schemes make reality come off as thinned out and characterless on its own, prior to what thought or language projects upon it, or as a site of emptiness, arbitrariness, and ruin, prior...

Frank J. Garcia, author of Consent and Trade, on US trade policy under the leadership of Donald Trump

In The Scientific Foundation of Zoos and Aquariums: Their Role in Conservation and Research, our goal was to showcase some of the best zoo- and aquarium-based research going on around the world. We tell stories of dolphins and penguins – we love dolphins and penguins as much as you do – but it’s the animals whose stories don’t always see the light of day who best illustrate groundbreaking efforts to save species.

Global environmental issues were identified as a crisis in the 1960’s (1). The alarmist rhetoric caught the public’s attention, but stimulated a pessimistic attitude (2) that human beings were destabilizing...

The neuroscientist Kent Kiehl – popularly known as the “psychopath whisperer” – thinks that many psychopaths have brain dysfunctions that explain their violent behavior. Famously, he served as...

Reason and emotion are often supposed to be at odds with each other. From one perspective, our emotions are like unruly toddlers, demanding and whimsical, that need to be held in check by the adult intellect....

The Christian Bible, the best-selling book of all time, is read by many people in many different ways. For example, it is possible to read it with an eye toward how it has formed Western culture. A few...

Imagine, no-one had brought to light Johann Sebastian Bach, after the many years that he and his works had entirely been forgotten, or nobody performed the Moonlight Sonata of Beethoven, or nobody had...

As you’ll hopefully discover, rewilding pushes the boundaries of our comfort zone by forcing us to recognize the dynamic nature of biological systems, and factor in change instead of fearing it. Ultimately, the rise of the rewilding concept is a sign that new approaches are urgently needed to conserve biodiversity and maintain ecosystem services under increasingly unpredictable global conditions, as traditional approaches on their own are demonstrably unfit for the challenges ahead.

Anne Innis Dagg was the first person to study giraffes in the wild in Africa in the 1950’s and is now considered the world’s first ‘giraffologist’.

Cambridge University Press is delighted to announce the appointment of Alejandro L. Madrid as co-editor of Twentieth-Century Music, joining co-editor Pauline Fairclough from January 2019. Since 2013, Alejandro...

In November 2018, the Department of Education released new proposed Title IX regulations, replacing Obama era guidance on how educational institutions should handle allegations of sexual assault and sexual...

Do you know what knowledge is? Before you reply, ponder for a moment the Gettier problem. It’s a puzzle. It’s a challenge. It was a moment; now it’s a tradition. It’s a centrepiece of contemporary...

In October 2018 ITV’s ‘Good Morning Britain’ ran a debate entitled ‘Do People Hate Vegans?’. In November the vegan activist group Direct Action Everywhere staged a protest at a Brighton steakhouse,...

Einstein once remarked, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” Expressions like these are increasingly common. Saturated with social media and soundbites, many lament modern life’s flood...

Can you really be famous for explaining someone else’s ideas? Speaking as a historian of philosophy I can tell you the answer is: not really. But one man who just about managed it was Ibn Rushd, often...

How we name and narrate food matters. To see what I mean, consider the different namings/narrations of a plant as either a flower, a tomato plant, or a weed. Flowers are plants to behold and admire, tomato...

Until recently one of the most intensively managed bird species in the world, having been reduced to around 12 individuals in the 1990s. In 2007 it was the only species globally to be down-listed from Critically Endangered to Endangered; an excellent illustration as to how work on islands is providing positive conservation success stories and lessons for parrot recovery projects internationally.

Why Is Strategic Conservation Important? In an Interview, Robin Murphy, Vice President, Marketing and Communications, The Conservation Fund asks Will Allen & Kent Messer, Authors of The Science of...

In nearly every article about Earth Day, whether it is about water scarcity in South Africa or algal blooms in Great Lakes, the same traditional message is underscored: embrace environmental science and...

Grzegorz Mikusiński tells us why his book Ecology and Conservation of Forest Birds is so important

As a conservation planner, Will is engaged in advancing structured decision making tools able to quantify the benefits of potential conservation investments that result in better project selection and decision making. As a behavioral economist, Kent is engaged in cutting-edge research and outreach efforts related to efficient and effective environmental conservation. Read what they have to say about forest protection using the science of strategic conservation

In his fourth instalment, Huub Ehlhardt, co-author of On the Origin of Products, discusses the origins of the smartphone.

S.I Strong, author of Transforming Religious Liberties, discusses new ways of combating religious extremism.

Bruce Rocheleau discusses what can be done to preserve big cats and other endangered species

That England (and Wales) voted Leave in the Brexit referendum of 2016, and that Scotland (and Northern Ireland) voted Remain is now a fact of political life. People resident in these different parts of...

Vito Tanzi, renowned economist and author of Termites of the State, discusses the industrialized world's economic development during the 20th century to today...

Amid widespread and often heated contemporary debates about an existential ‘clash’ between the ‘Islamic World’ and the ‘Christian West’, there is growing evidence that Arabic-Muslim women are...

November 23, 2017 sees the publication of Ecology, Conservation and Management of Wild Pigs and Peccaries by Mario Melletti and Erik Meijaard. In this post the authors bring to light the importance of these often-overlooked species.

Mitchell Begelman, co-author, with Martin Rees, of Gravity's Fatal Attraction comments on the recent image from the Event Horizon Telescope that shows the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole.

Todd Timberlake author of Finding our Place in the Solar System discusses the variety of astronomical definitions for a “month” and why it is actually useful to have all of these unique definitions.

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