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A friend in India has shared this notice on Facebook: ‘The British people are finally experiencing what’s it like to have the British rule your country.’ During the past ten weeks I...

Again, if e’er she walks abroad, Of course you bring some wicked lord, Who with three ruffians snaps his prey, And to a castle speeds away; There, close confined in haunted tower, You...

By the Establishment, I do not only mean the centres of official power—though they are certainly part of it—but rather the whole matrix of official and social relations within which power is exercised....

…all these pandemics share a common factor, namely the role of international travel in spreading the contagion. The Justinian Plague (541-546 CE, with intermittent recurrences until about 750...

It’s not the end of the world. But with the coronavirus running rampant, you could be forgiven for thinking so. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse symbolically portray the four events that will occur...

During recent weeks we have witnessed often abusive gatherings in the United States and Spain demanding that covid-19 restrictions be lifted. Flags are flown, anthems are sung, slogans are cheered, all...

For some years now there has been a flourishing debate between those who advocate for a more open-bordered world and those who want nations to have more powers to restrict border crossings. Sometimes...

As part of our ongoing goal to help the academic community in these difficult times, we have asked the authors of some of our most popular textbooks to take part in Lockdown Lectures, a series of Facebook...

In April 2020 U.S. President Donald Trump began to lash out at the World Health Organization, blaming it for what he claimed were missteps, failures, and prevarications in its handling of the coronavirus...

“Not much,” might be one’s first reaction to this essay’s title question. Archaeologists are not exactly first responders. We are, if anything, last responders. And yet surprisingly, archaeology...

The change from our lives BC (before coronavirus) to the lockdown most of us around the world are currently experiencing was dramatic and sudden. Many began working from home, often while also juggling...

The Covid-19 pandemic underscores an already-existing, more general tension in our current world-system. On the one hand, disease – like capital – is now fully globalised; it knows no boundaries,...

The first sight accosting me on May 9, 2020, as I turned to the news from India, was the image of rotis (flatbreads), some still aggregated in the thin piles in which they were being transported, lying...

During the current coronavirus crisis, the whole world has been forced quickly to become accustomed to living in a constant state of uncertainty and unpredictability. Parameters shift from one day to...

It is a mystifying fact that the 1918-19 Spanish influenza pandemic—which infected one-third of the world’s population and killed between 50-100 million—inspired almost no works of American literature....

When politicians started calling the coronavirus an “invisible enemy”, it was obvious that the rhetoric accompanying the pandemic was moving from science to magic. Both Donald Trump and Boris Johnson...

Trust is at the heart of societal and governmental responses to COVID-19, and will inevitably shape and be shaped by those responses. On the one hand, trust is essential for democratic governments needing...

I too have measured out my life with coffee spoons in the endless days of the lockdown. Instant coffee, to be precise, as I follow the global Dalgona coffee phenomenon that appears daily in my ‘news’...

‘I do not intend to conflate ecological with epidemiological calamities, though of course they can be intimately linked’, wrote Anahid Nersessian in 2013. Can we, though, compare Covid-19 to the Anthropocene,...

A striking feature of life during a pandemic is our interest in rules. Rapidly changing legal rules regulate our everyday decisions about where we can go, what we can do, and whom we can visit. In addition...

For a historian of religion, an interesting aspect of the COVID-19 pandemic has been witnessing the resurgence of popular interest in religious beliefs and practices across Europe that might have seemed...

Plagues, pestilence, inundations and devastations, usually visited upon a complacent people, are as old as our oldest myths (perhaps we should have paid them more attention). But in Covid-19 and the global...

The COVID-19 pandemic that has shaken our globe to its core has highlighted the need for rapid, responsive and relevant research, now more than ever. The field of rapid research is not new and different...

Finding myself shut indoors until further notice and scouring my home library for a book that could provide solace in these trying circumstances, my eyes fell upon a work by Thomas Aquinas: Literal Exposition...

The dramatic impact of the Coronavirus has highlighted how thankfully rare pandemics are in the modern world. The Roman empire, by contrast, suffered from regular bouts of contagion, among the most deadly...

Rabindranath Tagore wrote these verses at the beginning of the last century, describing what a liberated nation, and world, would appear to him. Just this January, the American actor Martin Sheen invoked...

I’m not a regular tweeter, but on Sunday evening (10-05-20) was driven to reach for my phone as Boris Johnson signed off from his ‘keep alert’ broadcast, next-steps-in-the-pandemic, rallying call...

In Australia, something (or other) is in the air. The worst bushfire season on record has been succeeded by COVID-19. Iconic beaches were eerily empty during the Easter holiday period, being part of the...

Although politically progressive, Jacinda Ardern has consistently used the language of conservative, rural New Zealand throughout the COVID-19 crisis. She often does so through sport, not surprisingly...

“We’re all in this together,” proclaim many Americans in this time of the global covid-19 pandemic. One meme displays the word VIRUS with the letters VIR marked out, highlighting US. The solidarity...

What picture to show on the cover of a book about climate extremes? Such events have a big potential to cost human lives and harm the economy. Illustrate this danger? A photo of a starving child in a...

As someone who thinks and writes about how speculative fiction helps us to navigate the ways that science and technology shape daily life, I regularly encounter proclamations that we are “living in...

A viral pandemic is spidering across the globe, and so too is an emotional one. Fears and anxieties spread and mutate in whispered late-night conversations and flashing updates, working...

Living Lockdown as an academic historian has meant learning a great deal, and fast. There was the move to online teaching and student support, meetings to plan the first academic year with social isolation,...

In times of crisis, when people experience fear, they often express hostility toward others. They discriminate against people who look like “enemies”. The well-known and shameful internment of Japanese-Americans...

We hope everyone enjoyed our Facebook Live Q&A yesterday with Kris Lane, Matthew Restall and Merry Wiesner-Hanks! Thank you to everyone who submitted questions. It was great to hear about the authors’...

I gaze at the vista outside my study window and absorb the splendor of spring. We have been sheltering in place for eight weeks now. I trace the lush horizon marked by swaying trees and the tender green...

Last autumn, I ran a course at the University of Hong Kong on “The Ecological Imagination in Film and Literature”. On the first day, I looked around the spotless, climate-controlled classroom and...

It’ll be quiet in town now; unnaturally quiet – as when you catch it at that early hour when the few people about are either straggling home from clubs or turning in for the first shift at work. But...

Covid-19 has emptied our streets and blighted the places where we come together in community, revealing that the cities we have built have made us willfully blind to a fundamental truth: all things living...

In Camus’s The Plague (1947), two Frenchmen in the Algerian town of Oran “gazed down at what was a dramatic picture of their life in those days: plague on the stage in the guise of a disarticulated...

When Freud first glimpsed the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor in 1909, he remarked to Jung, ‘They don’t realize we’re bringing them the plague.’ Freud felt certain the Americans...

All over the linguistics world, linguists are staying safe, like everyone else, but in their newly imposed spare time are having a field day, because Covid-19 has given them a new lexical world to explore....

Mexico City is no stranger to the Apocalypse. Carlos Monsiváis, one of its famous chroniclers, often used the term to depict the experience of living in this most surreal of world capitals. In the 1990s,...

One of the most salient ways in which people of Asian ancestry in the United States (as in many other places) have been racialized is being perceived as foreigners. They’ve just always stood out as...

“If it bleeds, it leads” – the cynical motto of the modern media, which uses fear and sensationalism to drive up ratings and sell advertising. But were medieval and Byzantine narratives sources...

Thinking with Marx breeds shared projects. Over the last year and a half we have been co-editing a collection of essays on 21st-century Marxist literary criticism, and this winter, in order to prepare...

Ask someone what comes to mind when they hear the word ‘apocalypse’. The end of time? Images of cataclysmic destruction? Catastrophic climate change and worldwide devastation brought on by a neglectful...

Governments across the world have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic with measures that are unprecedented in peace time in terms of the degree to which they seek to reshape the behaviour of individuals...

Mary Shelley’s 1826 novel about a mysterious pandemic that obliterates human beings attracted attention during the advent of AIDS in the 1980s and 1990s; once again The Last Man has a sad currency....

When I was about eleven years old and growing up in Accra my father’s cousin, with whom he was very close, lost his wife to a terrible car accident. Uncle Alfred (his name) was inconsolable. A...

Covid-19 has had many people reaching back to the plague which Apollo sends on the Greek army at the very beginning of Homer’s Iliad; Western literature begins with a devastating disease of unknown...

Like everybody else, I am an inhabitant of this planet; and I am a member of many other smaller communities too. I am an American citizen, for example. I was made a citizen from birth retroactively by...

In addition to the medical and economic aspects of the current crisis, the psychological challenges it poses have over recent weeks increasingly claimed our attention. Even if one is not affected personally,...

In The Age of Anxiety (1947), begun during the Second World War, W.H. Auden observed that ‘in times of crisis, display of even the crudest kind of affection between people can be profoundly ennobling,...

The relatively brief geological time span of our species’ existence has been punctuated again and again by catastrophic events–volcanic eruptions, devastating climate changes, melting glaciers...

Writing a blog article about a book on climate extremes in these weeks or months or years of SARS-CoV-2, the Corona virus? At the beginning of this job, I feel embarrassed since I am doing fine as regards...

Cada vez más pequeña mi pequeñez rendida, cada instante más grande y más simple la entrega mi pecho quizás ruede a iniciar un capullo, acaso irán mis labios...

The village of Barrington, in Cambridgeshire, presents the viewer with a quintessentially English rural scene: with its thatched cottages and village pub, and one of the best-preserved and extensive village...

Power-sharing measures, rules that allocate decision-making rights among groups competing for access to state power, appear to be experiencing something of a renaissance. A conflict resolution tool that...

When I’ve been on holiday in a foreign city, I’ve always enjoyed wandering around aimlessly in its public spaces, getting to know them in a wholly unsystematic and haphazard way, and even in Cambridge,...

An emergency is defined not by the inherent badness or dangerousness of a situation, but by what we make of it. To call something an ‘emergency’ is to declare that something can and must be done about...

In November 1983 a twenty-nine-year-old man named Bruce Burnett returned to his homeland, New Zealand/Aotearoa, from San Francisco. Bruce hadn’t been in San Francisco long: he had left New Zealand...

In the last chapter of James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Dedalus misquotes a line from Thomas Nash’s “Litany in Time of Plague.” Nash wrote the poem during one of a...

The most important virtues in our present situation are undoubtedly patience, self-restraint, and forbearance.  Yet none of them is contained in the catalogue of virtues in Aristotle’s ethics (see...

Political scrutiny of the UK’s management of Covid-19 has recently revolved around an ambitious target the government set for itself: the goal of carrying out 100,000 tests per day by the end of April....

I knew in mid-February that we might be quarantined, and so I stocked up on essentials that became rare later. I knew in early March that economic catastrophe was imminent. My foreknowledge didn’t...

The coronavirus has enormous revelatory power. All at once, it has disclosed issues of social justice and biopolitics, biodiversity and violence, scientific research and global economy. This power, however,...

I am seventy-nine years old and I have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. It is a pretty severe lung disease and, until recently, if you developed it, make sure your will is in order and you might think...

In the preamble to his History of the Peloponnesian War Thucydides declares that the twenty-year conflict between Athens and Sparta was a war like no other, an object lesson for humanity involving what...

In 1923 two precocious and fury-filled Cambridge undergraduates – Christopher Isherwood and Edward Upward – co-wrote some extraordinary, inventive, and obscene stories. Together they imagined...

Early medieval England experienced nothing quite like the Coronavirus, although plagues and afflictions of other kinds came all too frequently. The venerable Bede (d. 735) and other contemporary writers...

I have been asking myself what wisdom or solace the Romantic poets might offer us during this time of death and fear and self-isolation. We won’t be climbing Mont Blanc or Mount Snowden anytime soon,...

Endless war. I caught onto this phrase several decades ago, already several decades into my work on the literature and history of the First World War. There, as the conflict wore on, the phrase gained...

In the early stages of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s strategy to tackle the coronavirus pandemic, much was made of, and much criticism was directed at, the advisory input from behavioural scientists....

There is an image, associated with the covid-19 pandemic, that I am unable to forget among the countless reports of the crisis one encounters every day in newspapers and online. It is not an image of...

Singer-songwriter John Prine fell ill with the Covid-19 virus in March and eventually succumbed to it on April 7. He was a balladeer of the common man, a poet of everyday life with a knack for folding...

A common language and forum for debate on state transitions is essential today. Our age is indeed characterised by the increasing involvement of diplomatic actors in the constitutional and transitional...

Toilet paper has become the unlikely posterchild of the coronavirus. Toilet paper, and its absence. Much has been written about what seems, at first sight, an unlikely association: after all, diarrhea...

Tucked away in my North Yorkshire home, in the surreal tranquility of Newton-on-Ouse—since the floods of February and March a little welcome sunshine has brought out the bluebells to replace the daffodils...

Last week my fifteen year old son wrote a short piece of fiction, entitled ‘Thursday’, that reflected on how strangely anonymous the days become when we are...

London, under the conditions of social isolation, has been turned inside out. Its centre is empty; its peripheries are full of people. The streets of the city’s suburbs, in the unseasonable...

Sooner or later, our pandemic triggers a heartfelt question from its reflective victims: Why us? Of course, we can sketch a biological answer in terms of viral mutation and transmission, but that only...

For years Hollywood has been filming the viral apocalypse, and now at last we seem to be trapped in it—though our virus is not as fast-acting or as deadly as those on film. Nor is it as interesting...

“Isn’t this your moment?” ask my friends nowadays. “You’re a scholar of the apocalypse.” My work examines how American authors have written about the apocalypse and its aftermath, from...

I have always been fascinated by the imposing Pestsäule (Plague Column) in Vienna, erected by Emperor Leopold I soon after the plague epidemic of 1679 that killed as many as 75,000 people. Situated on...

“Bombardment of Vienna on the night of the 12th of May [1809],” from the collections of the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies, San José State University.

New Orleans is never more lovely than in April. But this year, we’ll have no Jazz Fest – and we’ll have to get by without those rolling block parties we call second-line parades too; and without...

Each evening the world awaits with anxiety the new numbers John Hopkins University provides for the spread of COVID-19 around the globe. This fascination with mortality rates during an epidemic is nothing...

MIt’s remarkable how Trump can make an unprecedented situation seem so familiar by cranking it through the language grinder he’s been using all along. Since the start of the COVID-19 crisis, we have...

Ask the majority of the world’s inhabitants to close their eyes and imagine a city. They might picture skyscrapers, railroads, busy highways and throngs of people. Whilst they may think of cities near...

‘Gods. The Onchesimoi ask whether there is a plague/famine threatening them?’ ‘The Dodonaeans ask Zeus and Dione whether it is because of the impurity of some man that god sends the storm?’ ‘Nikokrateia...

About disease, I am a fatalist. Fifteen years ago, I was diagnosed with a brain tumor; then ten years later, Parkinson’s Disease.  In neither case could I have done anything to avoid getting...

When natural disaster strikes the so-called developing world it is, both literally and figuratively, no surprise. Pundits and journalists across the political spectrum tend to normalize tragedy in places...

Jorge Luis Borges wrote that his nightmares took the form of a trajectory across a labyrinth or a room of mirrors. There was always a distant destination and a very concrete topographical starting point:...

My friend’s mother died on Wednesday in a Dublin hospital, of C-19. None of the usual obsequies are available to me now: I can’t send flowers or go to the funeral. What’s left to me is words and...

One of the most best-known conversations about Dublin took place in Zürich, when James Joyce was walking down Universitätstrasse with his friend Frank Budgen. “I want to give a picture of Dublin so...

A friend in her early forties has the onset of her IVF treatment cancelled because of Covid-19. She is devastated. Another is in lockdown with a partner many of us know is overly controlling and who we...

Darwin was sick most of the time. He spent his adult life trying to recover from the physical toll taken by his famous Beagle voyage. But he was also fascinated by disease, especially diseases, like rabies,...

Two days ago, with my partner, wishing to avoid public transport, I cycled across Paris on a vélib (city bike) from the 2nd arrondissement where we live to the suburb of Ivry-sur-Seine, in order to have...

Writing in The Guardian, Marina Hyde eloquently illustrated why the last thing we need just now is Second World War metaphors. ‘Plague is a standalone horseman of the apocalypse’ she observed, ‘he...

My Bajan grandfather was a carpenter. He worked on the Panama Canal Zone where there were gold and silver payrolls (white employees were paid with a gold standard, blacks with a silver), gold and silver...

A recent article in The New Yorker pointedly asked what the humanities should do in a crisis[i]. Similarly, in our own humanities group we have had many conversations of late about the meaning of what...

On July 9, 2011, it was announced with great fanfare that South Sudan had become the world’s newest nation state. As new countries are wont to do, that very day President Salva Kiir promulgated a new...

(Or granddaughter, sister, patient, client, student or friend) The Body Image Book for Girls is out September 10th, 2020. Read more about the book here! Conventional wisdom suggests that parents...

Part 1 outlines the rapid worldwide use of mobile phone location data for contact tracing purposes. Part 2 concludes by examining how information privacy law protections apply now and how they should...

It’s a scenario that’s been on the very top of every cybersecurity official’s list of nightmares for a good while now: a cyberattack targeting critical IT infrastructures of a hospital, bringing...

Imagine you’re a policymaker who wants to expand parental choice of private education. You’re not alone: sixty school voucher programs operate across the United States, offering hundreds of thousands...

Should we forgo information privacy law protections for COVID-19 mobile phone contact tracing? Governments worldwide view contact tracing as a key tool to mitigate COVID-19 community transmission. Contact...

A sustainable food revolution holds the key to ending the Sixth Extinction that is wiping out the world’s wild animals and plants. “Such is the insatiable power of the human jawbone that rethinking...

How we understand and respond to failure is one of the most defining features of how our lives pan out. Some people refuse to fail. Some people expect to fail. Some people always hide from their own failings...

Alexandru Grigorescu, author of 'The Ebb and Flow of Global Governance', on the international response to public health crises

Humans have yet to explore Planet Earth in terms of what it can offer that is good to eat. “Food can give full rein to humanity’s imagination, dreams and ideas. It can prevent war and secure our future...

Algorithms are sometimes compared to cathedrals, in that they share the same ambition, and the same folly. Some algorithms, such as telephone operating systems, data management systems, or search engines,...

It started and ended in Chile! This might be the introductory sentence to an economic history of our times. After the 1973 military coup the “Chicago Boys”, a group of Chilean economists educated by...

The World Trade Organization has always had more critics than champions.  These days, the charges that are made against the WTO include that it has overstepped its authority, that it impedes the ability...

  Investing one fifth of the global arms budgets in a new world food system will end hunger everywhere – but also greatly increase prospects for world peace. “At present humanity invests around...

Voter turnout among young Americans has been dismal since 18-year-olds earned the right to vote with the passage of the 26th amendment in 1971. Even in 2018—a high water mark for youth voting—a full...

In October 2019, Turkey launched operation “Peace Spring” in north-east Syria.  The operation aimed at driving the Kurdish YPG out of the area to create a twenty mile-wide “safe zone” to resettle...

Paul M. Collins, Jr. & Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha, authors of "The President and the Supreme Court" on Donald Trump's tweets.

Acting is an elusive art, because – unlike for example a painting, sculpture, poem or score – an actor’s performance cannot be held in the hand, and is not available to pin down for...

I don’t know who will win the 2020 presidential race, but I do know who will lose: the biggest bully on the block since Billy Franklin beat-up Joey Tarnower in the sixth-grade and ran-off with his lunch...

People who love poetry are not likely to love these sorts of thing:  ˌɪntərˈnæʃənəl fəˈnɛtɪk ˈælfəbɪt VP   ->   t (M) (have + prf) (be + prg) V *h2ner-seerg  gwhen-ontabs ...

In a thought-provoking piece in Politico Magazine , Professor Justin Gest proposes a “Moneyball Fix” for America’s immigration system.  Taking a page out of sports analytics, he suggests that the...

New York: A Literary History is the result of a lifetime of reading books about the city and reading authors who made the city their home. From Stephen Crane, James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, and Zora Neale...

“Get there if you can and see the land you once were proud to own…” W. H. Auden’s Poems (1930) presents a catalogue of exhausted landscapes and fragile psyches. This line in particular repeats...

Present-day political controversies are strikingly like those in Britain at the end of World War Two. I’ve constructed The Cambridge Introduction to British Fiction, 1900-1950 to call attention to that...

We need new thinking and new politics if the world is to get out of the mess we are currently in. A new book Global Green Politics provides a tour de force of the contribution of Green politics to building...

Long before I decided to work on a scholarly edition of Anne Finch’s work, I was drawn to her distinctive voice. I first heard it as an undergraduate student in the 1980s, but in the least propitious...

One afternoon at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight in the summer of 1896, Louise Margaret, Duchess of Connaught, took this photograph of her niece, Helena Victoria, swimming on her back. The photograph...

Rising tensions over scarcities of food, land and water combined with increasingly unstable climates threaten to unleash new wars and the mass flight of hundreds of millions of people by the mid-century. ‘Food...

In this book, Cathy Willermet and Sang-Hee Lee reflect that the “steadfast obsession with the scientific approach that characterized biological anthropology, like no other subfield in American anthropology, is in fact a response to mask the dark history surrounding its birth”.

Why were these 17 species such successful colonisers in contrast to most other birds? Most cosmopolitan birds exploit water environments and because there is water everywhere, with continents surrounded...

The world food system on which nearly 8 billion humans depend for their daily sustenance is at risk of disintegrating by the mid-century as global soil and water resources and climate stability fail. I...

2020 Democratic presidential candidates are attacking charter schools, education vouchers, and test-score-based teacher accountability schemes, even backtracking on their past support. Following other...

If you want to understand how it went from being called the “Dead Sea” to the world’s most important “Super Basin”, read the new book Gulf of Mexico Sedimentary Basin: Depositional Evolution...

In August 2014, about seventy evangelical clergy in the Brazilian city of Juiz de Fora gathered for the monthly meeting of the local Council of Pastors. The worship/meeting space was an unadorned hall...

When UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres at the recent Climate Action Summit in New York urged countries to “show the way towards a full transformation of economies in line with sustainable development...

Once again, pro- and anti-abortion advocates are clashing across the United States. Will reigniting this conflict over defining moral issues spill over to influence abortion policy worldwide? Producing...

In a lecture given in 1978 the Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges observed that nations tend to choose authors to represent them that do not resemble their national character, citing, as a striking example,...

Authors, Carol Frieze and Jeria L. Quesenberry debunk five common myths on the Gender Gap in Computing

Ours is the Age of Food. Food is a central obsession in all cultures, nations, the media and society. There is a rising danger of ‘food wars’ – conflicts over food, land and water – as the world...

The book accumulates more than a 40-year experience of the authors’  research in the field  of chemical non-equilibrium effects in combustion and reactive flows and includes our theoretical developments...

In the century preceding the French Revolution advanced mathematics began to play a role in ordinary affairs. If you wanted to find the position of a ship at sea, design fortifications or price annuities,...

When trying to choose the science and the scientists that shaped the 20th century, many think about nuclear energy and the near mythical names of Maria Skłodowska-Curie, Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Albert...

After the clamour of the centenary of the ending of the First World War, how are we best to remember those who died in it? This was the question some were asking at the very first anniversary of the Armistice,...

TMI (“too much information”), TLDR (“too long; didn’t read”), and DNC (“does not compute”).  These acronyms offer painful reminders of our contemporary relationship with information.  ...

Debates over party structure and party organization have been long-running throughout American political history. Starting with Andrew Jackson and his reforms of the party system, later joined by the Progressive...

  In this memorable photograph (courtesy of NASA), we see astronaut Buzz Aldrin holding in his right hand a sophisticated mirror: the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR3). This mirror has now been...

James Zimring discusses the struggle of how to evaluate the claims of science in a world that demands an ever more rigorous consideration of how much confidence to put in such claims. Each of us is taught what science claims to be the case, but to what extent are we taught the basis for such claims – the strengths and pitfalls of science itself?

In the mid 17th century, Varenius, the founder of modern geography, wrote that of all the natural phenomena, none had perplexed scientists more than the tides: the connection to the Moon was as empirically...

Lately, climate change has been unmistakably present in the public sphere…Yet, conversations about climate change have remained stuck. Lately, climate change has been unmistakably present in the...

Author Mike Berners-Lee gives us an insight into what it’s like to record an audiobook version of his book “There Is No Planet B“ “ When I write, I am thinking of myself talking, which...

It is almost inevitable that conversations regarding the Holocaust will generate questions of comparison to other historical instances of mass death. And, conversely, it is almost unavoidable when discussing...

From Doraiswami Ramkrishna and Hyun-Seob Song, authors of 'Cybernetic Modeling for Bioreaction Engineering'

The current outbreak of measles across the United Kingdom, United States, and other industrialized nations has given rise to bitter conflict about vaccinations. Mental health providers may not intuitively...

It is widely known that the American criminal justice system is uniquely punitive, and that the harsh carceral and collateral impacts of tough-on-crime policies have disproportionately burdened the poor...

Changes in the levels of political participation can alter the course of history. If turnout had been higher among young British voters in the 2016 European Union membership referendum, the United Kingdom...

Most people know the story of king David. The young boy who beats the giant, the poet and musician, God’s favorite — this is familiar. What is less known is that when David’s son Absalom goes...

My research career has taken a somewhat non-linear path, starting in theoretical cosmology and ending up in marine sciences. Each transition has required me to learn new things, and so many years ago I...

Adapted from Morality and the Environmental Crisis We cannot heal our relation to nature—and even perhaps include nature into a new and vibrant “ecological” democracy—with methods we have used...

Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca, author of 'The Historical Roots of Political Violence', on the causes of 20th century revolutionary terrorism.

As an American, I can’t help but read the slow-motion drama that is Brexit through the lens of the 2016 Trump election. Each is a referendum on a half-century of internationalist and neoliberal policies...

Must law pass a moral test in order to be valid? Most legal theorists today answer this question in the negative. The dominant tradition in contemporary legal philosophy, known as legal positivism, maintains...

Natural law theories maintain that there are certain goods and principles that are uniquely conducive to human flourishing. Historically, the content of natural law has often been depicted as timeless...

The Desert Fathers were the earliest Christian monks. They are the foundation stone of a movement that so developed over the centuries that it eventually wholly took over the Western Church and almost...

Simon Black, Author of, Species Conservation; Lessons from Islands, explains how our challenge is to understand how we can co-exist with nature by addressing two drivers of change. First, we need the positive efforts of the few people who have necessary technical skills to transform wild ecosystems. Second, we need to divert the negative impact of the millions of us human consumers (who create the problem in the first place) and reverse our psychological separation from the natural world.

Jamie A. Copsey, Author of Species Conservation, tells us how he thinks the world needs more positive perspectives on the future we want to shape, and then we can really start thinking about how we get there.

David Johns, Author of, Conservation Politics; The Last Anti-Colonial Battle, tells us how ultimately global conservation is failing. Why, when the majority of people say they value nature and its protection? David Johns argues that the loss of species and healthy ecosystems is best understood as human imposition of a colonial relationship on the non-human world - one of exploitation and domination.

Sergei Volis' book, Plant Conservation, argues that existing practises of plant conservation are inadequate and firmly supports the placement of ecological restoration at the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. The author unifies different aspects of conservation into one coherent concept, including natural area protection, ex situ conservation and in situ interventions through either population management or ecological restoration.

Among the core cultural rights, outlined in the International Bill of Human Rights, are the rights to education, to participate in cultural life, to benefit from science and its products, and author’s...

Dementia as life. That sounds all wrong, doesn’t it? Just look at the facts. Dementia is the umbrella term for a number of different organic brain diseases, which are progressive and terminal. Its symptoms...

Mathematics rivals theology when it comes to ontological difficulties Mathematics rivals theology when it comes to ontological difficulties; consequently there are today three very different philosophical...

Fatemah Alzubairi discusses her new book Colonialism, Neo-Colonialism, and Anti-Terrorism Law in the Arab World.

Do you have a soul? In ancient Greece, answering ‘yes’ to this question would not necessarily imply that you had any strange metaphysical or religious beliefs. This is because, for an ancient Greek,...

Ecologists have fully embraced the study of climate change and grassland ecologists have often led the way in these studies, thanks to the tractability of doing ecological research in such environments, publishing nearly 1000 studies in that time. My colleague, David Gibson, and I decided it was time to take stock of what we have learned, at least for grasslands! This is the first review to focus solely on climate change.

Authors, Beatrice, Jenny and Silvio tell us about how the research emphasis has recently expanded from a focus on conflicts to include the broad spectrum of interactions between people and wildlife that range from negative to neutral to positive.

Managing Director of Academic Publishing, Mandy Hill, reflects on why it is important to mark International Women's Day and why Cambridge University Press are making related content free and accessible throughout March.

Certain intellectual schemes make reality come off as thinned out and characterless on its own, prior to what thought or language projects upon it, or as a site of emptiness, arbitrariness, and ruin, prior...

Frank J. Garcia, author of Consent and Trade, on US trade policy under the leadership of Donald Trump

In The Scientific Foundation of Zoos and Aquariums: Their Role in Conservation and Research, our goal was to showcase some of the best zoo- and aquarium-based research going on around the world. We tell stories of dolphins and penguins – we love dolphins and penguins as much as you do – but it’s the animals whose stories don’t always see the light of day who best illustrate groundbreaking efforts to save species.

Global environmental issues were identified as a crisis in the 1960’s (1). The alarmist rhetoric caught the public’s attention, but stimulated a pessimistic attitude (2) that human beings were destabilizing...

The neuroscientist Kent Kiehl – popularly known as the “psychopath whisperer” – thinks that many psychopaths have brain dysfunctions that explain their violent behavior. Famously, he served as...

Reason and emotion are often supposed to be at odds with each other. From one perspective, our emotions are like unruly toddlers, demanding and whimsical, that need to be held in check by the adult intellect....

The Christian Bible, the best-selling book of all time, is read by many people in many different ways. For example, it is possible to read it with an eye toward how it has formed Western culture. A few...

Imagine, no-one had brought to light Johann Sebastian Bach, after the many years that he and his works had entirely been forgotten, or nobody performed the Moonlight Sonata of Beethoven, or nobody had...

As you’ll hopefully discover, rewilding pushes the boundaries of our comfort zone by forcing us to recognize the dynamic nature of biological systems, and factor in change instead of fearing it. Ultimately, the rise of the rewilding concept is a sign that new approaches are urgently needed to conserve biodiversity and maintain ecosystem services under increasingly unpredictable global conditions, as traditional approaches on their own are demonstrably unfit for the challenges ahead.

Anne Innis Dagg was the first person to study giraffes in the wild in Africa in the 1950’s and is now considered the world’s first ‘giraffologist’.

Cambridge University Press is delighted to announce the appointment of Alejandro L. Madrid as co-editor of Twentieth-Century Music, joining co-editor Pauline Fairclough from January 2019. Since 2013, Alejandro...

In November 2018, the Department of Education released new proposed Title IX regulations, replacing Obama era guidance on how educational institutions should handle allegations of sexual assault and sexual...

Do you know what knowledge is? Before you reply, ponder for a moment the Gettier problem. It’s a puzzle. It’s a challenge. It was a moment; now it’s a tradition. It’s a centrepiece of contemporary...

In October 2018 ITV’s ‘Good Morning Britain’ ran a debate entitled ‘Do People Hate Vegans?’. In November the vegan activist group Direct Action Everywhere staged a protest at a Brighton steakhouse,...

Einstein once remarked, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” Expressions like these are increasingly common. Saturated with social media and soundbites, many lament modern life’s flood...

Can you really be famous for explaining someone else’s ideas? Speaking as a historian of philosophy I can tell you the answer is: not really. But one man who just about managed it was Ibn Rushd, often...

How we name and narrate food matters. To see what I mean, consider the different namings/narrations of a plant as either a flower, a tomato plant, or a weed. Flowers are plants to behold and admire, tomato...

Until recently one of the most intensively managed bird species in the world, having been reduced to around 12 individuals in the 1990s. In 2007 it was the only species globally to be down-listed from Critically Endangered to Endangered; an excellent illustration as to how work on islands is providing positive conservation success stories and lessons for parrot recovery projects internationally.

Why Is Strategic Conservation Important? In an Interview, Robin Murphy, Vice President, Marketing and Communications, The Conservation Fund asks Will Allen & Kent Messer, Authors of The Science of...

In nearly every article about Earth Day, whether it is about water scarcity in South Africa or algal blooms in Great Lakes, the same traditional message is underscored: embrace environmental science and...

Grzegorz Mikusiński tells us why his book Ecology and Conservation of Forest Birds is so important

As a conservation planner, Will is engaged in advancing structured decision making tools able to quantify the benefits of potential conservation investments that result in better project selection and decision making. As a behavioral economist, Kent is engaged in cutting-edge research and outreach efforts related to efficient and effective environmental conservation. Read what they have to say about forest protection using the science of strategic conservation

In his fourth instalment, Huub Ehlhardt, co-author of On the Origin of Products, discusses the origins of the smartphone.

S.I Strong, author of Transforming Religious Liberties, discusses new ways of combating religious extremism.

Bruce Rocheleau discusses what can be done to preserve big cats and other endangered species

That England (and Wales) voted Leave in the Brexit referendum of 2016, and that Scotland (and Northern Ireland) voted Remain is now a fact of political life. People resident in these different parts of...

Vito Tanzi, renowned economist and author of Termites of the State, discusses the industrialized world's economic development during the 20th century to today...

Amid widespread and often heated contemporary debates about an existential ‘clash’ between the ‘Islamic World’ and the ‘Christian West’, there is growing evidence that Arabic-Muslim women are...

November 23, 2017 sees the publication of Ecology, Conservation and Management of Wild Pigs and Peccaries by Mario Melletti and Erik Meijaard. In this post the authors bring to light the importance of these often-overlooked species.

The emergence and spread of COVID-19 has led to increased discrimination against Asian people, and specifically led to anti-Chinese prejudice. The virus is believed to have originated in a wet market...

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