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  • 4 Dec 2023
    Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

    The Flawed Foundations of the Electoral College

    Central to our concept of democracy is counting all votes equally. Who would support an election rule in which we add up all the votes and declare the person who came in second the winner?  But that is exactly what can—and does—occur under the electoral college.  In 1876, 1888, 2000, 2016, and, arguably, 1960, the […]

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  • 22 Sep 2023
    Brian H. Bix

    Agreements in Our Family Lives

                Many of our interactions with other people are structured by formal or informal agreements:  we agree to work for a company for a set wage, we pay other people to fix our car or to dry-clean our clothes, we agree to meet a friend for lunch, and spouses and neighbors may take turns picking […]

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  • 24 Aug 2023
    Jacob Eisler

    Balancing Justice and Autonomy in Democratic Design

    As democracy across the globe faces new stresses and dramatic challenges, the power of the judiciary to reshape electoral procedure is increasingly important. Yet underlying any judicial intervention – for good or for ill – in how people rule themselves is a threshold question: why does the judiciary have authority over the essence of democracy […]

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  • 14 Jul 2023
    Matthew Titolo

    Privatization and Its Discontents

    Infrastructure and privatization are enduring topics in modern political discourse. Privatization and Its Discontents: Infrastructure, Law, and American History places these contemporary hot topics in perspective, identifying today’s debates as deeper problems within liberal statecraft that are of long historical vintage. In the American context, infrastructure has been created through models of public-private governance, and […]

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  • 5 Dec 2022
    James J. Park

    Lying About Innovation

    The federal convictions of two founders of technology companies over the last year has illustrated the fine line between the over-optimism of entrepreneurs who believe they can change the world and the criminal intent to defraud investors. As it has become routine for stock valuations to reflect the future profits that may be generated by […]

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  • 18 Oct 2021
    Raphael Cohen-Almagor

    Just, Reasonable Multiculturalism

    I have been thinking and writing about religion and culture since the 1990s. However, I did not think about writing a book. I was more preoccupied with questions pertaining to media ethics and medical ethics. The turning point was 2011. Then, Prime Minister David Cameron went as far as saying that multiculturalism had failed and […]

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  • 8 Jun 2020
    Daniel Ghezelbash

    COVID-19 and the End of Asylum

    The hard-won institution of asylum is under threat. States around the world have shut their borders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s now near impossible for most asylum seekers to travel in order to access protection and there is a real risk that this may become the new normal. The 1951 Convention Relating to […]

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  • 30 Apr 2020
    Aziz Z. Huq, Tom Ginsburg

    How Do Constitutions Get Implemented?

    On July 9, 2011, it was announced with great fanfare that South Sudan had become the world’s newest nation state. As new countries are wont to do, that very day President Salva Kiir promulgated a new Constitution, the Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan. With substantial input from international actors and academics, the […]

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