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What if fines could be adjusted not only to the severity of the offense, but also to the income of the offender? What if the rich pay a higher fine than the poor for the same offense? This is not just...

As an applied linguist interested in science communication, an important specialised domain of language in society today, I have developed high perceptiveness of the richness and the power of the...

During the 1990s, in Egypt, Professor Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd was prosecuted by a group of attorneys and condemned by two courts of the Egyptian national judicial system to be divorced from his wife based...

Most readers recognize E. M. Forster as the early twentieth-century writer who wrote about India; some remember his socially relevant and thematically wide-ranging Edwardian novels and short stories,...

Four years ago, when I began to write From Crust to Core, A chronicle of deep carbon science, the astrophysicist in me looked forward to documenting the story of how Earth’s carbon originated long ago...

Writing a book about John Steinbeck has many twists and turns, but something I never expected was to go viral in the process. I was interviewed by Dalya Alberge for The Guardian/The Observer about my...

These are not the days when most educators would be inclined to turn to a writer with the profile of Wallace Stevens (1879-1955). A Eurocentric white male upper-middle-class poet, academically installed...

My study of the history of Shakespeare publishing and editing, Shakespeare in Print, first appeared in 2003. In recent years, it has come to feel that the book was in need of significant updating and...

So said former CIA Director R. James Woolsey to the House Armed Services Committee in 1999, channeling what had become a consensus about Iraq in the U.S. foreign policy establishment by the end of the...

“Sheer Playfulness and Deadly Seriousness are my closest friends,” Philip Roth once famously said of his own work. The enduring appeal of this assertion derives in part from the fact that it so accurately...

How did Canadian fiction, essentially a late-nineteenth-century/early-twentieth-century creation, come to be a major avenue of world fiction in little more than one hundred years?      More...

After years of struggling to complete a book on scientific revolutions and the development of scientific knowledge, in 1962, Thomas Kuhn published The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Three years...

What inspired this book? Colloidal suspension rheology continues to be among the most active areas of research in the field of soft matter as evidenced from the literature and among the most subscribed...

Why does art even have a history, asked Ernst Gombrich in his classic book Art and Illusion? We might suppose, for instance, that everyone’s pictures would be different, a stylistic jumble resulting...

Amidst surges of right- and left-wing populisms—from Trumpian Tea Parties to Black Lives Matter—one cannot avoid hearing accusations that one or another opponent is “divisive” and intolerant....

In a passage of A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf reported that Italian men of letters had expressed their hope – in a telegram to il Duce Benito Mussolini – that ‘the Fascist era would soon...

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 are often understood in dichotomy: Americans as those who used the bombs, the Japanese as those affected. I wanted to break the dichotomy by writing...

Governmental responses to the Covid 19 pandemic—in the United States, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere—have been deeply inequitable. People of color and people living in low-income households and neighborhoods...

What are the humanities? Who needs the humanities? Two questions I needed to address when I became dean of a School of Humanities. Those questions are not merely relevant in university politics. They...

The Covid-19 pandemic represents a profound challenge for all of mankind. A year after the first outbreak was discovered, deaths directly caused by the virus surpassed 2.5 million, and that number was...

We hope you have been enjoying The Cambridge Forum webinar series! A couple of weeks ago, we had a great session exploring what coins can tell us about the Classical world, featuring Dr Gilles Bransbourg,...

Dismay over the current state of international economic relations has some policymakers longing for return to some imaginary notion of the good old days. But this is a time to look forward, not back....

Feedback dynamics is a topic that many engineers feel they should know. Feedback loops appear everywhere in engineering and science, and a command of feedback greatly increases one’s ability to design...

How is sound generated and transmitted in ducts? This question is studied in duct acoustics, a branch of acoustics. Why do we study duct acoustics? I hope that this post will complement my recent book...

In response to escalating xenophobia and bigotry against Asian Americans at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Stop AAPI Hate reporting center was formed on March 19, 2020 to track and respond to...

This month, our book “The Maudsley Trainee Guide to the CASC: Preparing for the MRCPsych CASC Examination” will be published after years of tireless labour. We were driven to create this preparatory...

Back in the 1700s, the first performance of an actor in the patent theatres would often be under some anonymous title like ‘A Gentleman (who never appear’d on any stage)’. Sometimes, actors even...

The five plays in Volume IV of the Cambridge Edition of the Works of Aphra Behn date from the final years of Behn’s professional career. Three of the plays were performed during her lifetime: The City-Heiress...

The electoral victory of Donald Trump in the United States in 2016, Brexit in the same year, and particularly the emergence of right-wing populist movements in Europe (e.g., France, Germany, Austria,...

Brian Kennett and Andreas Fichtner met when Brian was visiting the University of Munich from Australia on a Humboldt Research Award. They have since collaborated on a number of papers, mostly involving...

Talking to machines is becoming commonplace. We routinely tell our smart speakers what to play next, we tell our satnavs where we want to go, we ask our phones general knowledge questions, we dictate...

How to transition to a zero carbon economy in a timely and fair fashion is one of the greatest challenges the world faces. Bill Gates spelt out his vision of how to do it in his recent book How to Avoid...

International judges regularly decide important cases, on matters ranging from entrenched border disputes, costly trade wars, the most fundamental of our human rights and violent armed conflicts. Their...

The figure above presents a thumbnail history of the airplane’s aerodynamic development over the twentieth century, including some of the significant contributors who helped to bring it about. This...

“Nobody reads books anymore” is the secondhand testimony I hear from colleagues about how current medical students and residents prefer to learn.  “They want soundbytes.”  Short, succinct...

What are the most distinctive achievements of European civilization? According to the Bulgarian-born thinker Tzvetan Todorov, they are rationality, justice, democracy, individual freedom, secularism,...

In this blog on the history of discovering the science of the Earth as a physical object I begin in antiquity with the philosopher Eratosthenes of Cyrene (276–194 BCE). He became first enquirer to arrive...

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s HEMINGWAY premieres on PBS on April 5, 2021. Directed by acclaimed documentary filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, written by Geoffrey C. Ward, and produced by Sarah...

The police killing of George Floyd ignited concerns around the globe about the need to respond to police violence. The COVID 19 crisis has also raised concerns about prison conditions where prisoners...

When I became chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) eight years ago, after treating people with severe mental illness, teaching, and then co-leading a suicide...

Nowadays reading literature, particularly fiction, is perceived as a predominantly feminine activity. The figure of the female reader—though she is not always wearing clothes or even paying attention...

The author photo below shows me at the entrance to a gallery exhibit built up of approximately 10,000 discarded books, reflected in infinite multiples by mirrors on floor, sides, and ceiling, constructed...

Photo By: Al Bello/Getty Images.

Zoos and aquariums are popular public attractions, but what kinds of learning happen there? Can that learning translate into action for conservation? Zoos and aquariums across the world have contributed...

Marie Tharp’s transatlantic profiles with her annotations of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its central valley. Acknowledgement:  US Library of Congress. Simon Mitton. In this post on “deep...

While running for office, Joseph Biden set out an ambitious platform of reforms he intended to make on immigration and refugee policy. Judging by the first six weeks of his Presidency, he is keeping his...

In All Passion Spent (1931), Vita Sackville-West’s eighty-eight-year-old protagonist thinks back over her life: “She had plenty of leisure now, day in, day out, to survey her life as a tract of...

My book Aristotle on Thought and Feeling concerns the relationship between thought and feelings (including desires), a topic that has exercised philosophers, psychologists, poets, novelists, and, most...

Amanda Gorman, delivering her poem at the 2021 presidential inauguration. Photo credits: Thomas Hatzenbuhler, Architect of the Capitol. Sourced from Library of Congress Blog

I am a retired neurologist with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.  For nearly 25 years I practiced and taught general neurology.  Many of my patients had dementia including Alzheimer’s disease,...

You have heard of the Seven Deadly Sins: pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, and sloth. Each is a natural human weakness that impedes happiness. In addition to these vices, however, there are deadly...

Joe Biden has become President of the United States at a time when the country faces acute crises on many fronts. The most pressing—in both health and economic terms—is the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,...

It sounds like an odd contradiction that anyone might enjoy melancholy: an age-old disease of body, mind, and spirit typically characterised by sadness and fear. Melancholy’s symptoms could be extreme,...

Vaccines to combat the threat of Covid-19 have been developed at an amazing speed – in under a year. The figure below, from the journal Nature, puts this spectacular success in perspective — the...

For a Native studies scholar who studiously avoids definitive proclamations about the nature of our field or procrustean taxonomies of its artistic productions, editing a Cambridge History of Native American...

To coincide with the publication of The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Race, we talked to some of the contributors of the volume. We asked them what they hope students and teachers would gain...

According to figures generously supplied by Martin Wiggins, of the approximately 3000 plays that were written between c.1567 and 1642 in England, a mere 543 from the public theatres have survived in print...

In modern times we experience regular public exchanges of opinion, whether about COVID-19 policies, humanity’s influence on climate, or whether or not the local jail needs replacing.  When arguing...

The recent spat between the EU and the UK over the legitimate status of EU ambassadors is a reminder of the ways in which states assert their existence. By refusing to give the EU ambassador the same...

There is overwhelming evidence that climate interactions among ocean basins provide key contributions to global climate variability in a wide range of time scales.  For example, it is accepted...

We have spent the last couple of years editing a Cambridge volume on gender in American literature and thinking about what the Trump administration’s glorification of white patriarchal nationalism has...

Worldwide, we are becoming more tribal in our thinking, but we define our tribes differently than we did in the past. In the 21st century, we define our tribes in terms of shared beliefs rather than through...

In 1686, John Moyle published a guidebook for young surgeons working in the navy. Before a battle, he advised, they should set up their stations ready to perform amputations. They’d need a barrel to...

Hello and welcome to my blog on “deep carbon science” –– a fascinating research field in the geosciences. My history of deep carbon science gives lively accounts of 150 scientists who contributed...

Combating climate change and transitioning to fossil-free energy systems are two central planetary challenges humanity faces today Combating climate change and transitioning to fossil-free energy...

The world established an international tax regime in the 1920s which most countries follow with respect to cross-border transactions. It has had a remarkably successful tenure. There has been, however,...

Four years ago, Americans watched our national language start to shift, with symptoms that included a president who claimed fake news and alternative facts, and extremists who spoke hate-filled worlds...

The breadth and variety of works that can be gathered together under the heading of ‘the novel in French’ is nothing short of breathtaking. Of course France is a major source for these works, but...

There is no question that COVID-19 has brought tremendous suffering around the globe. We have lost over one million humans to the pandemic. Some who have been infected have long-lasting and devastating...

How should we go about trying to understand the behavior of people and other living organisms? One way is to look for its causes. This is the approach taken by most scientific psychologists and is the...

As I scripted the outline for this collection, the United States held the questionable honor of being the only country in the world to have withdrawn from the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, to date the...

This book is part of a critical educational psychology commitment to engage in ideological, cultural, political, and philosophical discussions about the application of psychology in and outside of schools....

Friedrich Schiller’s little poem is one of the greatest works of German Classicism, the revival of Greek thought and literary forms centered in the Weimar that Goethe and Schiller made famous, but its...

In the last thirty years, the field of disability studies has fully emerged, bringing a new vocabulary for understanding disability, that grew out of, and continues to grow with, the disability rights...

Emili is an amateur chess player. Occasionally, he plays chess in international opens, which for diverse reasons are enticing for both local non-professional club players and professional players from...

As an undergraduate in 1964 I took a seminar in the English Romantics (the six male poets then considered canonical) and was imprinted like a chick by the first poet we read, William Blake. ...

The year 2020 will long be remembered as a year in which global energy markets witnessed significant upheavals due to the effects of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Oil prices fell...

The importance of competent government is perhaps the most important of the many painful lessons that are being learned during the pandemic. The significant variation in death rates across the globe illustrates...

It’s a robust finding that people react differently to meat depending on how it is labeled. In well-known experiments subjects rated ground beef that was 25% lean as both higher quality and significantly...

Since the first English settlements in North America, Christianity and its sacred text have had a significant influence on American jurisprudence. This reflects Christianity’s imprint on Western legal...

“to study the phenomena of disease without books is to sail an uncharted sea, while to study books without patients is not to go to sea at all” Sir William Osler, 1849-1919 It...

Think of the lies. Climate change is a hoax. Colonization benefits the colonized. Rape is your fault. Grief is your fault. Mortality is your fault. Tragedy exposes these lies. I argue in my book...

The last decade has witnessed an unprecedented battle between values and pragmatism, and between humanitarianism and immigration control in large parts of the world. Asylum as an institution has always...

You can read Part I here. Equal treatment of state and private interests in contract law The equal protection of private and state interests is not an empty statement. It can be shown in the streamlining...

Travelling between the cities of the former British empire can produce an uncanny sense of déjà vu: despite vast social, cultural and environmental differences, you’ll see familiar street names and...

2020 has been an exceptionally challenging year. The widespread of Covid-19 affects everyone’s life across the globe. As we manage to live through the endless lockdowns and reopens and learn to live...

What inspired Bioinspired Structures and Design? This book was inspired by a course entitled “Bioinspired Structures” (16,982) that was taught by Prof. Leo Daniel at MIT. This highly successful...

The afterlife as envisioned by medieval Europeans was both a strange and familiar place. For us, hell conjures images of fiery rivers and demons, while heaven calls to mind shining white figures in repose....

The New Irish Studies powerfully demonstrates how thoughtful close readings and diverse critical approaches enhance our understanding of twenty-first-century Irish writing. Across recent decades, the...

This is why all legal practitioners should start learning about it For those that still do not know (yes, these people exist), ‘Third Party Funding’ (‘TPF’), stricto sensu, is the professional...

The response to the COVID-19 crisis puts the spotlight on public spending and the role of the state in advanced countries: How much should governments spend – is there an “optimal” level of...

When I started to dream up my book Paper in Medieval England: from Pulp to Fictions, I wanted to find out why medieval people were interested in paper and how paper became a success story in pre-modern...

The emergence of a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court just a few weeks before the general election, and the hasty efforts to fill that seat with Judge Amy Coney Barrett, has made constitutional interpretation...

Ask yourself, do you believe persons with a disability have a right to work? If yes, what kind of work? At this point a lot of people will say it depends upon their abilities. If only that was true. 37.9%...

As we enter the final weeks before the U.S. elections, the stakes could not be higher. Against the backdrop of a surging pandemic, the country continues to experience record unemployment, small-business...

As we head into a new academic year with many institutions relying on online course delivery, instructors are confronted with the need to find new ways to engage their students. We’ve rounded up the...

What inspired Rigid Body Kinematics? This book is the result of a professional life devoted to Newtonian Mechanics, both from an educational and a research point of view.  Early on, our lectures...

Just a few years ago, who would have thought that algorithms would be regularly making important decisions once made by humans, and they would be so complex that we would not be able to fully understand...

The Republicans’ rush to appoint Judge Amy Coney Barrett before the presidential election is yet another example of polarized politicians and citizens fighting over an increasingly polarized Supreme...

It’s been hard to make sense of COVID-19. At least, I have found it hard. So many deaths. So many changes to everyday life. So much political strangeness. So much uncertainty about the future. This...

Criminal law has long served as a powerful symbol of the state’s monopoly over the use of violence. However, as the world becomes more economically, technologically, and socially interconnected,...

The first thing to say for any reader who is not familiar with scholarly editions like this of Hardy’s fiction, is that it is different from all others and really significant. It gives, if you combine...

My love affair with The Woodlanders began many years ago when I covered much of the groundwork for a scholarly edition while doing my MA —entitled “Materials for an edition of Thomas Hardy’s The...

My daughter is taking an undergraduate course in Shakespearean theatre this semester, and one of her foundation readings is Elinor Fuchs’s influential short essay, ‘E.F.’s Visit to a Small...

In some ways producing a scholarly edition of Desperate Remedies is easier than editing other Hardy novels, first of all because there is no extant manuscript. The story is that after he completed...

When COVID19 hit Norway people were given strict cabin lockout. The government-imposed quarantine meant not only enforcing staying home orders, closing schools, and promoting social distancing in other...

The Dark Side of Human Rights! The End/The Endtimes of Human Rights! Not Enough! These are the alarming titles of some recent books on human rights. And indeed, for those who believe in human rights,...

With the Covid-19 pandemic unfolding across the world, schools, universities, daycare centers and other places of learning went into lockdown. As a response, in many countries education went digital,...

International organizations are becoming increasingly powerful. In recent decades states have steadily been conferring powers upon international organizations in order to solve transnational problems...

AI-based applications raise new, so far unresolved legal questions, and consumer law is no exception. The use of self-learning algorithms in Big Data analysis gives companies the opportunity to gain a...

Some of the permanent members of the UN Security Council periodically use their veto (i.e., negative vote)—or threat of veto—to stop resolutions aimed at preventing or stopping the commission of core...

“To steal a Hint was never known, But what he writ was all his own.” – Verses on the Death of Dr Swift, D.S.P.D. Part way through his most famous self-elegy,...

Countries around the world are struggling with the economic repercussions of the pandemic, and the United States in particular has recorded levels of unemployment not seen since the Great Depression. While...

Since mid-2017, reports of massive “re-education camps” in Xinjiang province have set off global outcries over the mistreatment of Muslim Uighurs in western China. Promoted as schools for deradicalization...

Wallace Arthur, author of The Biological Universe, sheds some light on one of humanity's most enduring questions.

COVID-19 has confirmed some long-understood yet long-ignored truths about the economics of information, and has also highlighted deeply disturbing fractures in today’s information ecology COVID-19...

This is the question that we get asked most often following the recent publication of our book Boom and Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles. With the U.S. stock market booming in the middle of...

Everyone has a personality. This term describes individual differences in behavior, emotion, and thought that make each person unique. Yet however different they are, most people find a niche in the world...

“To steal a Hint was never known,But what he writ was all his own.” Verses on the Death of Dr Swift, D.S.P.D. Part way through his most famous self-elegy, Jonathan Swift delivers...

California Senator Kamala Harris’s selection for the vice-presidential spot is an historic moment. Selecting Harris as a running mate appears to be a pretty reasonable choice for Joe Biden. She’s...

It is exciting and troubling to ponder the profound changes wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic. For example: what will remain of offices when all is said and done? Will there be any? Why make the commute—why...

The Euphemism Treadmill is common in the areas of language related to race and ethnicity, disease, and disability. What is this phenomenon? A euphemism is a word substituted for one that is considered...

As part of our ongoing goal to help the academic community in these difficult times, we have asked the authors of some of our most popular textbooks to take part in Lockdown Lectures, a series of Facebook...

The media is currently replete with American corporations signalling that they are going to pursue diversity on their corporate boards, in the C-suite, and among their employees. Some have made statements...

As Black Lives Matter brings millions together in the mission to end state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism, we want to highlight some of the work we’ve published – or will publish – that...

Until December 2019, I was in Nanjing, some five hundred kilometres from Wuhan where the first cases of the new lung disease were then discovered. When things unfolded in January, I initially felt a sense...

What is the nature of human religiosity? For much of the 19th and 20th centuries, psychologists treated this area of human life as a disposition – something Gordon Allport termed a ‘sentiment’.[1]...

The Corona pandemic and the ensuing recovery packages seem poised to bring about disruptions that will define world politics over the coming decades. Ultimately, the disruptions may trigger transformations...

In late 2019 an outbreak of COVID-19 was detected in the city of Wuhan, China. Within weeks, the virus had spread across the country, becoming an epidemic. The disease spread rapidly across the globe...

Author of The Biological Universe, Wallace Arthur, discusses what we can expect from the NASA Mars 2020 mission. The launch date is correct at time of publication.

The legal system is the bloodline for investigative journalism, yet proposed legal reforms may jeopardize it When Spotlight won the 2015 Oscar for Best Picture, it was billed as a movie about investigative...

In common with many other people, the months of near-lockdown find us reflecting on our previous experiences and work. As scholars working on literatures of mobility, this means thinking in particular...

Before venturing into a fully-fledged linguistic analysis of ritual behaviour during this time of social distancing, one issue worth discussing is the typological concept of ‘rites of aggression’....

Many people I know have been out walking more, since COVID-19 upended our routines and transformed our daily lives. For a while, during the first shutdown, the activity of walking was the only way in...

One of the many―arguably lesser attended―effects of the COVID-19 crisis has been the continued exacerbation of the vulnerability of migrants. With borders closed and the threat of the “end of asylum”...

One reason why Covidiotism attracts so much attention and strong feeling is that social distancing and its violations are strongly related to what the renowned sociologist Erving Goffman has described...

A crucial topic in moral philosophy involves the aggregation and comparison of harms and benefits.  How many, for instance, minor headaches relieved is worth a single human life?  How many people...

“Climate extremes cost human lives. They do harm to the economy. Examples are the Elbe flood in 2002, the European heatwave in 2003 or hurricane Katrina in 2005. The big question is how global climate...

Some reasons for writing a book are obvious from the start, but others emerge more slowly. With Swift in Print: Published Texts in Dublin and London, 1691-1765, I knew from the outset that I wanted to...

There are currently 77 clinical trials evaluating medications aimed at slowing the progression of Parkinson’s disease. On the surface that sounds like good reason to be optimistic that one of those...

Refugees in lower- and middle-income countries are facing some of the most serious consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic. In refugee camps, which have high population densities and thus present a particular...

Before we venture into a detailed analysis of interactional rituals and distance keeping, an interesting phenomenon worth considering is ‘covidiotism’ and its relationship with interactional rituals....

The coronavirus pandemic, even as it induces great anxiety and fear over people’s health, is at the same time causing disruption to our societies’ economies on a scale that is perhaps unprecedented....

The fifth volume of The Letters of Ernest Hemingway spans January 1932 through May 1934. With the critical and commercial success of his 1929 novel A Farewell to Arms, Hemingway had achieved international...

Library Company of Philadelphia https://www.librarycompany.org/

Wordsworth and Keats in a painting by Haydon.

Why isn’t the biblical literature taught alongside other philosophies? By any objective criteria, it measures up to the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. In Biblical Philosophy: A Hebraic...

Shortly after William Shakespeare’s famous words, “all the world’s a stage,” were uttered in the opening performance of As You Like It in the new Globe theater, the Red Dragon set sail to found...

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