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Democracy

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Tag Archives: Democracy

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  • 24 Aug 2023
    Jacob Eisler

    Balancing Justice and Autonomy in Democratic Design

    As democracy across the globe faces new stresses and dramatic challenges, the power of the judiciary to reshape electoral procedure is increasingly important. Yet underlying any judicial intervention – for good or for ill – in how people rule themselves is a threshold question: why does the judiciary have authority over the essence of democracy […]

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  • 17 Jul 2023
    Robert Kubinec

    Arabs Want Democracy—But Not With Corruption

    Despite the costly efforts of Arab activists and citizens over the past decade of the Arab Uprisings, today no Arab state can claim to be fully democratic. Two countries, Egypt and Tunisia, traveled farthest down the path towards democracy, and Tunisia witnessed ten years of democratic elections–but today neither country protects the rights of citizens […]

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  • 23 Apr 2021
    Michalinos Zembylas

    Affect, Right-Wing Populism and Education

    The electoral victory of Donald Trump in the United States in 2016, Brexit in the same year, and particularly the emergence of right-wing populist movements in Europe (e.g., France, Germany, Austria, Hungary) and other parts of the world (e.g., India, Turkey, the Philippines) during the last few years have revived academic and public discussions about […]

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  • 10 Mar 2021
    David Grant

    Power, Democracy and Trumpism

    What we are seeing Too much has been written about recent politics in the United States. As a result, there are wide and often contradictory views about how we should understand what has been going on and what is likely to happen within the several ‘out’ years from now. So perhaps it is time for […]

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  • 9 Mar 2020
    John B. Holbein, D. Sunshine Hillygus

    Why Many Young People Don’t Vote – And How to Fix That

    Voter turnout among young Americans has been dismal since 18-year-olds earned the right to vote with the passage of the 26th amendment in 1971. Even in 2018—a high water mark for youth voting—a full 7 in 10 voters failed to turn out. In most Presidential and Midterm elections it’s not uncommon to see older voters […]

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  • 20 Feb 2020
    Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha, Paul M. Collins Jr.

    Are Trump’s Tweets Unpresidential? – Often Yes, but Sometimes No

    Paul M. Collins, Jr. & Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha, authors of "The President and the Supreme Court" on Donald Trump's tweets.

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  • 14 Nov 2019
    Matt Grossmann

    Did Conservatives Transform State Education Policy?

    2020 Democratic presidential candidates are attacking charter schools, education vouchers, and test-score-based teacher accountability schemes, even backtracking on their past support. Following other issue debates, education positions are polarizing along partisan and ideological lines. But unlike other areas, education polarization follows a long national move rightward—as many states increased alternatives to traditional public schools and […]

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  • 22 Jul 2019
    Byron E. Shafer, Regina L. Wagner

    Polarization and the Fight over Party Structure

    Debates over party structure and party organization have been long-running throughout American political history. Starting with Andrew Jackson and his reforms of the party system, later joined by the Progressive movement and its battle against machine politics, there has been a persistent struggle, a war if you want, over party organization and the associated leverage […]

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