09

Apr

2016

If Shakespeare Couldn’t Think of the Right Word or Expression for Something…He Made One Up

 
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Chance are, you've used more than one of these words today.

 

Words Shakespeare Coined

accommodation

aerial

amazement

apostrophe

assassination

auspicious

baseless

bloody

bump

castigate

changeful

clangor

control (noun)

countless

courtship

critic

critical

dexterously

dishearten

dislocate

dwindle

eventful

exposure

fitful

frugal

generous

gloomy

gnarled

hurry

impartial

inauspicious

indistinguishable

invulnerable

lapse

laughable

lonely

majestic

misplaced

monumental

multitudinous

obscene

palmy

perusal

pious

premeditated

radiance

reliance

road

sanctimonious

seamy

sportive

submerge

suspicious

 

Expressions First Used by Shakespeare

 

all that glitters isn’t gold

barefaced

be all and end all

break the ice

breathe one’s last

brevity is the soul of wit

catch a cold

clothes make the man

disgraceful conduct

dog will have his day

eat out of house and home

elbowroom

fair play

fancy-free

flaming youth

foregone conclusion

frailty, thy name is woman

give the devil his due

green eyed monster

heart of gold

heartsick

hot-blooded

housekeeping

it smells to heaven

 

it’s Greek to me

lackluster

leapfrog

live long day

long-haired

method in his madness

mind’s eye

ministering angel

more sinned against than sinning

naked truth

neither a borrower nor a lender be

one fell swoop

pitched battle

primrose path

strange bedfellows

the course of true love never did run smooth

the lady doth protest too much

the milk of human kindness

to thine own self be true

too much of a good thing

towering passion

wear one’s heart on one’s sleeve

witching time of the night

 

Throughout 2016 we are marking the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare by following key themes, controversies and research relating to the life and legacy of the man himself.

This month we’re celebrating Shakespeare’s legacy and each day running from 1st to 23rd April we will be giving away a different prize for FREE from Cambridge University Press’s fantastic range of Shakespeare books!

To enter our prize draw simply fill in your details on the form below to be in with a chance of winning! www.cambridge.org/shakespearewin

As we celebrate Shakespeare’s legacy throughout April we really want to know what Shakespeare means to you, and why his work still matters 400 years after his death. Join the conversation by commenting here on our blog or tweet us using @CambShakespeare – we’d love to know your thoughts!

– See more at: http://www.cambridgeblog.org/2016/04/much-ado-about-winning/#sthash.qXWIUJWj.dpuf

– See more at: http://www.cambridgeblog.org/2016/04/puzzle-put-cover-of-ncs-romeo-and-juliet-title-together/#sthash.HeB0x16s.dpuf

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